Edward Porter Alexander III

This is a portraito
Edward Porter Alexander, III

Above is a portrait of Edward Porter Alexander, III (1891-1918). He was born in Duluth, MN to Edward Porter Alexander, Jr. (1863-1939) and Agnes Gordon Grady (1872-1963).

Both of his grandfathers were Confederate Army officers. His paternal grandfather, Brigadier General Edward Porter Alexander (1935-1910) of Georgia, “made history by being the first to use signal flags to transmit a message during combat over long a long distance” and wrote two highly regarded books about the the American Civil War. His maternal grandfather, Cuthbert Powell Grady (1840-1922) of Virginia, enlisted as a private in 1861 and finished the war as a captain and brigade assistant adjutant general.

Porter, as he was known, attended the University of Minnesota [UM] in the class of 1913, but he apparently dropped out after 1911. The stamp on the photograph card above appears to be UM’s mascot, a gopher, over a seal with a bow, but I could not prove it. If it is a gopher and a seal associated with UM, that would date the photograph to 1909-1911. Porter appeared in the 1911 UM yearbook, The Gopher, as the assistant secretary of the staff of the Men’s Union Carnival which occurred 22 October that year and started out “with a three mile parade, brought up in the rear by the Dekes on the water wagon.” He was also a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. Porter graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1914 with a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering. He was elected as a Junior of the American Society of Civil Engineers in November 1914. Porter returned to Duluth after graduating and started a contracting company called Alexander & Farrell with James A. Farrell (1876-1937), a former assistant city engineer of Duluth.

Porter married Myra Sundquist Salyards (1896-1972) in August 1917. Myra was born in North Dakota to Henry Franklin Salyards (1871-1944) and Mary Lane Ely (1871-1941), natives of Missouri. Henry was president of Ely, Salyards and Company, in Duluth, a firm involved in the distribution of grain all across the upper Northwest.

During the Tampico Affair in 1914, an episode of American involvement in the Mexican Revolution, while still a student at MIT, Porter applied for a commission in the U.S. Army. When the U.S. entered World War I in 1917 Porter received his commission as a first lieutenant in the Engineers Reserve Corps. He trained at Fort Snelling, MN, then trained at the Engineers Training Camp at Fort Leavenworth, KS, then had overseas training at Fort Travis, TX. On 17 February 1918 Porter departed Hoboken, NJ aboard the USS President Grant as a member of the 509th Engineers, Service Battalion-Colored which consisted of “17 officers (white), 101 non-commissioned officers (white) and 798 privates (colored).” They arrived at Brest, France, on 4 March 1918. He was an adjutant of Company D of the 509th at Saint-Nazaire, France, when he died of influenza on 5 September 1918 at the age of 27. He was buried in an American cemetery at Saint-Nazaire then re-interred at Arlington National Cemetery on 26 January 1922.

Tombstone of Edward Porter Alexander III, Arlington National Cemetery, Plot 3-4412-WS; FindaGrave Memorial ID 32488044

Myra married Louis Carl Hofmeister (1893-1990), a Tuscon banker, in October 1920, and they had two children.

Reverse of the above portrait of Edward Porter Alexander, III

I purchased this photograph at Station North Books (IG @stationnorthbooks, FB StationNorthBooks) on East Lanvale Street in the Station North neighborhood of Baltimore when the owner invited me down for a look-see. He had seen the article about this blog in Baltimore Magazine and thought I might like the place–he was right. You will love the place if you like old stuff.

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Edward Porter Alexander III

Mr. and Mrs. Wantz and Their Church, 1919

Ada Naomi Myers (l) and Edward Morrison Wantz (r)

The couple pictured above are Naomi Ada Myers (1891-1971) and her husband Edward Morrison Wantz (1886-1972) who resided in Pleasant Valley, a village in the vicinity of Westminster in Carroll County, MD.

Naomi was the oldest child of the five children of Upton Harvey “Uppie” Myers (1865-1936), a huckster, and Alice Catherine Motter (1863-1940) who married in 1890. Edward was the oldest of the 11 children of George Zephenia Wentz (1863-1921), a farmer in Uniontown, MD, and Mary Ann Helwig (1866-1949). Generally speaking, the name Wantz was rendered Wentz until Edward’s generation, but many times both spellings were used for the same family.

Naomi and Edward were married in the Lutheran Parsonage at Silver Run, MD, on 24 January 1911. They had two children. First came Margaret C. Wantz (1912-2001) who married James Norman Brown (1910-1990) in 1933 and had three children. Next came Richard Edward Wantz (1914-2002) who married Portia Virginia Crabbs (1919-2004) and had one child.

Wantz-Myers Wedding Announcement (The Democratic Advocate, Westminster, MD, 27 January 1911, p. 8)

Edward was a farmer, carpenter, furniture maker, and businessman buying and selling farm land and equipment. He served on the boards of the Union Mills Bank and the Westminster Trust Company which were among the predecessors of PNC Financial Services. Edward was also a founding member of the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Company. Edward was a charter member of the Pleasant Valley Cemetery Association, the cemetery where he and Naomi are buried, as are Margaret and Richard and their spouses.

Naomi and Edward were members of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church in Pleasant Valley and following is the church’s annual report for 1919. (You can download a .pdf of the report here.) Edward was presented with the first life membership in the church’s history in 1961. According to the history of St. Mary’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in Silver Run, which traces its origin to the unification of Lutheran and Reformed churches in 1762, St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church in Pleasant Valley was founded and 1879 and joined St. Mary’s in a two-church parish, a relationship which lasted until 1990. In 1991, St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church and St. Matthew’s United Church congregations, which were using the same building in Pleasant Valley, united to become St. Matthew’s United Church of Christ at Pleasant Valley. It gets a little confusing, but some understanding can be gained from this this Wikipedia entry about the United Church of Christ.

Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, cover
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 2
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 3
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 4
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 5
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 6

Pleasant Valley, MD and surroundings in 1877 (Atlas of Carroll County, Lake Griffing & Stevenson, 1877)
Reverse of the Portrait at Top of Page

Mr. and Mrs. Wantz and Their Church, 1919

Three Baltimore Ladies

Mary Ann Jessup Clemens Aul

The above photograph depicts Mary Ann Jessup Clemens (1846-1930). Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Augustus Ducas Clemens (1817-1897) and Henrietta Matilda Bryden (1812-1900) who married in 1841. She served as Grand Deputy for Maryland of Ladies of the Golden Eagle, the female auxiliary of the Knights of the Golden Eagle of which her husband served as Supreme Chief. During 1889-1922 she conducted dozens of real estate transactions that were recorded in local newspapers.

Henrietta was the daughter of William Bryden (1767-1840), a ship captain who was born in Edinburgh, and Elizabeth Goodman (1769-1839) who was born in London. William’s brother, James Bryden (1761-1820), was a proprietor of the Fountain Inn which stood on Light Street between West Baltimore and Redwood Streets until 1871. Henrietta was born and grew up on the family place which was located south of East Biddle Street between North Kenwood Avenue and Edison Highway. The site was later St. Alphonsus’ Cemetery until that was abandoned and industry took over.

Augustus was known as Augustus, Sr. because the was the first of his line born in the U.S., but he is sometimes identified as the fourth. His father, also Augustus Ducas Clemens, was thought to be a captain in the French fleet during the American Revolution. According to an obituary (pdf) printed in The Baltimore Sun of 25 September 1897, Augustus “laid off” the villages of Friendship and Oxford in 1868 “on what was then known as the Quaker lots.” Oxford and Friendship are now part of of the Better Waverly neighborhood on the east side of Greenmount Avenue between 25th and 29th Streets, and what is now known as Lock Raven Road was then known as Quaker Road. There is a Friendship Street in the vicinity but no easy-to-find sign of Oxford. In 1845 Augustus was appointed “agent to the city of Baltimore . . . to collect DONATIONS to erect a NATIONAL EQUESTRIAN STATUE, of imperishable Bronze, at the U. S. Seat of Government, to the memory of Hero and Patriot, ANDREW JACKSON.” The statue of President Andrew Jackson was installed in Lafayette Park across from the White House in 1853.

Mary married Jacob Henry Aull (1847-1921) in 1883 and they had one child, Herbert Walter Aull (1872-1961). Their house, Eagle Nest, was on a large lot on the northwest corner of the intersection of 25th Street and Greenmount Avenue. Jacob was also a real estate man and he sold insurance. He was a member of Fellowship Lodge 138, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and at the time of his death was the oldest past president of the Knights of the Golden Eagle. Jacob was the son of German-born parents, shoemaker Jacob Aull (1804-1876) and his wife Christiana Gusema (1812-1880). Jacob published a fine little book titled Old Land Marks which I enjoyed seeing in the Maryland Department of the Enoch Pratt Free Library (call number F190.7 .W3 A8). The book contains 37 photographs and descriptions which are listed here (pdf). It would be great if someone decided to reprint the book.

Eagle Nest, the Residence of Jacob Henry Aull and Mary Ann Jessup Clemens which became Adelaide Hall, a Boarding Home for Girls, and the Southern Hospital (The Baltimore Sun of 30 May 1912)
Helen Mary Bordley, AKA “Augie”

Pictured above is Helen Mary “Augie” Bordley (1871-1953). I found no explanation for the nickname Augie. She was the daughter of William Clayton Bordley, Jr. (1831-1897) and Laura Fitzgerald (1843-1886). William was a teller at the National Mechanics’ Bank until he resigned because of ill health and was appointed to the Baltimore tax department. Laura was a niece of Richard B. Fitzgerald (1807-1869) who was a sea captain and owner, with his half brother Washington Booth (1814-1892), of the Fitzgerald, Booth & Company, an international mercantile and shipping house based in Baltimore.

Census records all list Helen’s occupation as “none” or leave the section blank, but newspapers accounts show she conducted more than a dozen real estate transactions between 1921 and 1941. From at least 1900 until her death Helen lived with the family of her father’s sister, Mary Bordley (1852-1928), who married Augustus Ducas Clemens, Jr. (1845-1909), brother of Mary Ann Jessup Clemens Aull who is the subject of the photograph at the top of this page. Most of that time was at, or in the vicinity of Evesham (pronunciation), a 23-room stone mansion on a 56-acre estate located on what is now Dartmouth Road in the Evesham Park neighborhood. Augustus, Jr. bought the estate 1895 for $40,000. Augustus, Jr. intended to develop the land from the beginning but the mansion survived until 1961. The mansion’s carriage house was converted to a residence and remains there on a small lot on Dartmouth Glen Way. Look here (pdf) for a story about the Clemens family and Evesham, and here (pdf) to learn how Augustus, Sr.’s grandson, Bryden Bordley Hyde (1914-2001) used parts of the mansion to construct a home on Gibson Island, MD

Lydia McGee

Above is Lydia McGee (1848-1928) who also was a boarder with Mary A. J. Clemens Aull and family from around 1898 until her death. A death notice (pdf) identified her father as Robert L. McGee, but I think this Robert was actually her brother. Her parents appear to have been James McGee, born in Scotland in 1812, and Ellen Wright, born in England in 1819. James’ profession is “Bleacher” in the 1850 Census of Baltimore County, MD, and his sons followed him into this industry. This, along with other tidbits of information, indicates that Ellen was the sister of three brothers who established the Rockland Bleach and Dye Mill in Rockland, MD in the 1830s. The enterprise remained in the family until the 1940s and survives today as Rockland Bleach and Dye Works, a division of Rockland Industries, now known as Roc-Ion.

Lydia was a teacher all her life. A January 1874 newspaper account places her at Waverly High School on York Road. The school opened the year with 125 students and had 230 students by mid year. By 1881 Lydia was at the English-German Annex School #12 which educated 333 pupils that year. In 1914 she was honored (pdf) by former pupils as one of six surviving teachers at “the old Baltimore County School No. 13, which was started as a parochial school of St. John’s German Lutheran Church, Catherine and Lombard Streets, in 1872.” Her uncle Thomas Wright (1811-1900) bequeathed her two bonds of the City and Suburban Railway Company of $1000 each ($2000 = about $60,000 in 2019 dollars). Lydia also bought and sold real estate.

The following are the backs of the above photographs.

Back of Photograph of Mary Ann Jessup Clemen
Back of Photograph of Helen Mary Bordley
Back of Photograph of Lydia McGee

I spent more time reading and learning, finding graves and documenting them, and driving around looking at stuff than I did writing this time. Usually I’m looking for a little interesting information on a subject, but this time the amount of information on these families was overwhelming. I collected more than 150 newspaper articles. If you are curious about something you read here, drop me a line–I probably know the answer to your question or can find it.

I am most indebted to Suzanne LNU, the author of the excellent website Descent By Sea which discusses the genealogies of the Clemens and Bordley families, among others.

I am also grateful for the help I received from Mimi at the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore who helped me track down the location of Helen Mary Bordley’s grave, a critical bit of information that helped figure out who Helen was and where she came from.

Three Baltimore Ladies

The Benz Family

Helen, Hazel, and Alma Benz, circa 190

Pictured above are the Benz sisters. The baby in the chair is Helen M. Benz (1902-1970). Standing behind her is the next oldest sister, Hazel Benz (1897-1970). Big sister Alma Barbara Benz (1891-1909) is sitting. They were born and raised in Newark, NJ.

Their parents were George Benz (1866-1927) and Flora C. Hillert (1872-1953). All four of their grandparents were born in Germany and died in New Jersey.

Below is Alma as a younger girl. According to an obituary on her findagrave.com memorial, Alma died suddenly at home at 326 New York Avenue in Newark after being “in failing health for a long time . . . a faithful member of St. Stephen’s German Evangelical Church, its Society of Sunday School Teachers and Christian Endeavor Society, and the church choir . . . employed in the novelty department of the Celluloid Company.”

Alma Barbara Benz

Here is a photograph of Alma later in life:

Alma Benz, courtesy of Frank and Silvia McDonald

Hazel worked as a clerk and a seamstress and never married. Here she is in adulthood:

Hazel F. Benz, courtesy of Frank and Silvia McDonald

Below is a photograph of Helen as an adult. Helen married Roy Morgan (1891-1986), a mechanic born in Texas, and they had one daughter, Gladys Morgan (1936-1952), who died after a long illness at the age of 15. From the “In Memoriam” page of the Bloomfield (NJ) High School yearbook of 1954: “A vivid picture of Gladys’ small, quiet countenance can be recalled, curled up with a good novel or hiking on a brisk afternoon.”

Helen M. Benz Morgan, courtesy of Frank and Silvia McDonald

Below is a photograph of the girls’ mother, Flora. Identifications written on the photographs in this batch and the available records cause some confusion about Flora’s maiden name. In official records of her marriage to George and Hazel’s birth her maiden name is listed as Leitlein. All other available records, including some findagrave.com memorials created in modern times by relatives, show her to be the daughter of Ernest G. Hillert (1855-1937) and Anna Shubert (??-1907).

Flora C. Hillert Benz

Ernest and Anna had one other daughter, Frieda B. Hillert (1886-1947) who married Ferdinand H. Ehret (1884-1951). This batch includes three photographs of her:

Frieda B. Hillert Ehret
Frieda B. Hillert Ehret
Frieda B. Hillert Ehret

My head started spinning when I came across the following two photographs of Anna C. Leitlein (1870-??) who married a machinist named Maxmillian Joseph Eberle (1870-??) in 1891. They lived many years at 349 Walnut Street in Newark. Her parents were apparently G. Leitlein who was born in Württemberg, Germany around 1843, and his wife Anna. I could find very little information on the Eberle and Leitlein families.

Anna C. Leinlein Eberle and Mrs. Kunz
Anna C. Leinlein Eberle

I’ve spent enough time on this post. Newspapers.com hasn’t made any Newark papers available and without obituaries it is just too difficult to get to the real truth from the comfort of my home office command center. I’ll just post a few more of the photographs contained in this batch and leave it to the Internet to fill in the blanks as time goes by.

Here are Albert Benz and Jessie Benz. I suspect these are Albert Russell Benz (1866-??) and his mother Jessie G. Howe (1866-??) who married Martin Benz (1855-??). I could not connect them to our known Benz family members.

Albert Benz
Albert Benz
Jessie Benz

Here is Christina Volz. Three people named Christina Volz died in Essex County, NJ during 1894-1895 and I was unable to determine which one of them this is.

Each of the following three photographs has a caption on the back rather than the front, and the handwriting is different from the handwriting on the other photographs. These might not be associated with the others for any reason other than I found them in the same box.

Samuel Yobe, brother of Uncle Will, is a mystery to me:

Samuel Yobe

Below we have Rebecca Miller and her husband James Connell.

Frank and Silvia McDonald are genealogists and memorialists who allowed me to use the photographs they put on the findagrave.com memorials for the Benz sisters. Thank you! I provided the memorial number for Alma above. Hazel Benz’s memorial is #84386396, Helen’s is #74553594 and Gladys’s is #74554704. From there you can link to their parents and other relations.

The Benz Family

Charles Preston Gainor

1.jpg

Charles Preston Gainor (1892-1963) is pictured above on 12 February 1896. Preston, as he was known, was born in Baltimore, the son of Summers Everett Gainor (1862-1945) and Katherine Kennedy Brannon (1864-1916).

Preston married Alma M. Saucier Theriault (1890-1982), a native of Aroostook County, ME and a daughter of Pierre Saucier (1846-1920) and Marguerite Pinette (1860-1920). There were no children. Alma had come to Washington, DC with her then-husband Fred W. Theriault (1877-1958), also a native of Aroostook County.

Preston was the administrative assistant to the Chief Clerk of the U. S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia when he retired in 1950. He and Alma moved to Selby-on-the-Bay, MD and lived there at least until Preston died. Alma’s last known address was in Seal Beach, CA.

Summers was a brother of Hunter Boyd Gainor (1859-1928) who was a husband of Clara Beall Taylor Gainor Magruder (1881-1972), the subject of a post from 13 March 2017. This is a strange coincidence given that I bought the photographs from two different shops and a year and a half apart.

Charles-Preston-Gainor-back

Charles Preston Gainor

Willie Ann Burgess Krickbaum

Willie Ann Burgess Krickbaum front

Above is Willie Ann Burgess (1866-1932), a daughter of Egbert Ransom Burgess (1830-1984) and Martha Ann Jones (1835-1933). She was born in Albemarle County, VA and lived all her life there.

She married Baltimore native John George Krickbaum (1866-1948) in 1890. John’s parents were John C. Krickbaum (1843-1911) and Lena Elizabeth Lewis (1845-1930), both of whom were born in Germany.

Willie’s family were mill workers and lived in the section of Charlottesville, VA known as Woolen Mills. John followed this family tradition and was a mill worker into his 70s.

Willie and John had three children. Ena Maude Krickbaum (1894-1981) married a baker named James Richard Holloway (1891-1969) and they lived in Richmond, VA. Frederick Lewis Krickbaum (1896-1950), also a baker in Richmond before moving to Baltimore, married Nora Belle Hoover (1899-1988). Lula Mae Krickbaum (1898-1935) married a truck driver named Charles Edward Chisholm (1906-1962) and they resided in Charlottesville.

I was disappointed to be unable to discover how Willie from Charlottesville and John from Baltimore got together or to accurately date the photograph. Could it be a wedding photograph taken in 1890?

Willie Ann Burgess Krickbaum back.jpg

 

Willie Ann Burgess Krickbaum

The Langhirt Boys

I purchased this batch of five photographs at an antique store on The Avenue in Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood. They’re beautiful portraits and the names match. It doesn’t take much to get me interested.

Let’s start with the following photograph which has on its back the following inscription: Louis Langhirt 12 N. Dallas St., Baltimore, MD. I started with this one because it has the full name and address of its subject.

Louis address front

detail Louis Langhirt back

Next up is a photograph apparently taken the same day as the photograph of Louis. The only difference in the studio setting is that the prop table was swapped out for a chair. The caption on its back appears to say James Langhirt. I think there was some confusion on the part of the person who captioned these photographs. The subject looks like it could actually be Louis’ younger brother John rather than Louis’ older brother Andrew James.

Jimmie ? front

Jimmie ? back detail

Next is a photograph inscribed John Langhirt. It is obviously earlier than the previous two photographs.

John front

John back detail

The next one is captioned Bostie Langhirt. It seems that Bostie could be a nickname for Sebastian, the oldest brother.

Bostie front

Bostie back detail

The final photograph is captioned simply Langhirt. I think this must be the father of the boys, Martin.

Dad ? front

Dad back detail.png

Martin S. Langhirt (1853-1940) married Anna Catherine Zeller (1853-1923) in 1878 and they owned 1211 North Dallas Street from 1882 to 1919. The house was purchased for $400 with a ground rent of $25 payable to the previous owner. I suspect Martin’s middle name was Sebastian. Martin was born in Germany to Andreas Langhirt (1805-1869) and Katherina Megner (1819-1893). Anna was born in Maryland to German born parents Adam Joseph Keller (1815-1865) and Barbara Josepha Keller (1821-1866). Martin’s ancestry is fairly well documented by family genealogists but I could not independently confirm a lot of the details. Martin was a tailor early in life. Here is a screenshot of Martin’s immediate family’s entry in the 1884 edition of Wood’s Baltimore City Directory, and bear in mind that the house numbers on Dallas Street changed in 1887:

18841111 detail of Woods' Baltimore city directory (1884) p. 642.png

The given names Andrew, Martin, and Sebastian appear over and over again in the Langhirt family down through the years, and in every imaginable combination.

The five Langhirt brothers were (oldest to youngest):

  • Sebastian Peter Langhirt (1881-1941)
  • Andrew James Langhirt (1885-1941)
  • Frank Charles “Dutch” Langhirt (1887-1975)
  • Louis Martin Langhirt (1889-1973)
  • John Joseph Langhirt (1892-1971).

Sebastian Peter Langhirt married Blanche Lillian Shelley (1882-1910) in 1906. At his death Sebastian “had been in the Street Cleaning Department for the past five years, having had charge of one of the North Avenue divisions.” His pallbearers were members of the Eutaw Conclave of Improved Order of Heptasophs of which he had been a member for more than ten years.  Two of their four children survived infancy; Louis Martin Langhirt (1908-1978) and Martin Sebastian Langhirt, Sr. (1909-1971). Blanche’s death came nine days after the death of her daughter Helen L. Langhirt (1910) who lived only a few days.

Andrew James Langhirt married Minnie Alberta Woody (1883-1963) in 1908 and they had one daughter, Mildred Catherine Langhirt (1909-1972). He held several positions with the Henry B. Gilpin Company, a drug wholesaler. He was killed by a hit-and-run driver while crossing the street.

Frank Charles Langhirt also known as “Dutch,” worked with automobiles all his life, variously described as a mechanic, tow truck driver, and chauffeur. He worked for Walter Scott, “one of Baltimore’s pioneer automobile dealers,” before he opened his own business on East Lexington Street in 1923 offering towing and a “full line of accessories, tires, and lubricating oils.” He married Clara Virginia Cavey (1878-1943) in 1910 then Bessie Victoria Mummert (1906-1974) in circa 1945. He had no children.

Louis M. Langhirt seemed to do some real estate investment in the 1920s and 1930s, but lived with his siblings in later life. He never married.

John Joseph Langhirt married German-born Margaret C. Eckl (1889-1955) whom he met while they were attending St. James Parochial School and married in St. James Church. They had one child, Catherine Muriel Langhirt (1914-2000). After Eckl died he married Helen V. Backus (1907-1988). John retired in 1957 after a 45-year career in the Baltimore transit system that included 25 years as a conductor on the No. 15 streetcar line that traveled Belair Road.

Three of the photographs appear to have been taken on the occasion of the subjects’ First Communion. A visit to the The Archdiocese of Baltimore Archives housed at St. Mary’s Seminary and University would probably yield exact dates of the boys’ first communions and thereby date the photographs. Update: The records for St. James Church are also available online for a price at findmypast.com.

Harry Alexander Plumley (1871-1936) operated the “Balto Photo Co” at 588 North Gay Street in the late 1800s and early 1900s, as well as a photographic supply company and portrait gallery at 506 West Lexington Street in partnership with George C. Mueller.

Photographicus Baltimorensis, a wonderful blog about “Archeology of Maryland photographers of the 19th and early 20th centuries,” tells us that Julius Christian Friedrich Bernhard Hebbel (1853-1905) operated a photography studio in Baltimore beginning in the late 1870s and that the business continued in his name after his death.

We don’t have photographs of the two girls in the family, but we know stuff about them. Margaret Mary “Maggie” Langhirt (1879-1945) married Peter Faust (1875-1914) in 1900 and they had five children. She married Andrew George Reichert (1870-1949) in 1918. Catherine Anna Langhirt (1883-1935) married Michael Kilian Schellenberger (1879-1924) and they had three children.

An coincidence: Martin and Anna’s children were first cousins to Frank Zeller (1897-1979). I posted about Frank here and about his wife Jenny Kornick (1894-1982) here in July 2017. How’d that work? Martin’s sister Margaret “Maggie” Ursula Langhirt (1860-1941) married Anna’s brother Charles Francis Zeller (1859-1932). Frank’s dad was Louis M. Zeller (1864-1926) who was Anna’s and Charles’ brother.

This was a fun project but I spent too much time on it. There is a lot of genealogy left to do for this family and many interesting things to learn. Here are a couple of newspaper articles of interest:

19030515 Langhirt Zellers wedding anniversary The_Baltimore_Sun_Fri__May_15__1903_
Langhirt-Zeller 25th Wedding Anniversary, The Baltimore Sun of 15 May 1903

19130202 Sebastian Langhirt's horse in Jones Falls The_Baltimore_Sun_Wed__Apr_2__1913_
Sebastian Langhirt’s horse fell into the Jones Falls; The Baltimore Sun, 2 April 1913

 

 

The Langhirt Boys