Lucille Edwards of Capa, SD

This blog was suspended for a few weeks as I tried to get my arms around some other projects, but one of those projects is pretty depressing, particularly in the current climate, so I spent a few days on this blog to clear my head a little. The photograph is one of a cache I received from a Stuff CTW Found field operative currently deployed to South Dakota.

Lucile Edwards When a tiny girl & Doll. Capa S. D.

The above photograph depicts Lucille Margaret Edwards (1914-2007). The caption on the back states she lived in Capa, Jones County, SD. The Census of 1920 enumerates her family as living on the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in Lyman County, SD. Easterners like me must rejigger their conception of distance when considering places like South Dakota.

Lucille’s father was Charles Erwin Edwards (1886-1971), a farmer, who was born in Wisconsin to Wisconsin-born parents. Lucille’s mother was Karolina Sophie “Lena” Kohler (1887-1925) who was born in Wisconsin to German-born parents. They were married in Lyman County in 1909.

Lucille married John Arthur Hansen (1913-1996) in February 1939 in Estherville, IA where he was born. John’s father was Jens “John” Hansen (1872-1947) who was born in Denmark. His mother was Andrea Husby (1886-1961) who was born in Norway. Jens was a tailor in Denmark and in Germany before moving to the USA in 1893. According to an obituary featured in his findagrave.com memorial, Jens bought out a tailor in Estherville in 1894 and added a dry cleaning plant in 1905. John followed his father in the dry cleaning business. Lucille and John had three sons.

Lucille and John both died in Hawaii and are buried near John’s parents in Oak Hill Cemetery in Estherville. There is a photograph of Lucille on her findagrave.com memorial page and you can see that she retained that dimple in her chin until adulthood. On her memorial page and on John’s memorial page there are several photographs of the family.

When and why did they move to Hawaii? I don’t know the answers for certain but I think it has something to do with Al Phillips (1907-1984). Known as Al Phillips the Cleaner, Phillips spent 40 years in the dry cleaning business in Oregon and Las Vegas before retiring and moving to Honolulu in 1964. Unable to remain retired, Phillips built an Al Phillips the Cleaner plant on McCully Street, then sold it in 1968. Lucille and John appear in a Portland, OR city directory in 1955 and John is working for Ideal Cleaners in Beaverton. They were still living in Portland in 1961, but in 1971 they were living in an apartment on McCully Street in Honolulu, the same street where Al Phillips built his dry cleaning plant. In my imagined scenario, Phillips knew John from Portland and recruited him to help set up the Honolulu edition of Al Phillips the Cleaner. John’s obituaries inform that he was retired from Al Phillips the Cleaner. Perhaps a family member will shed light on this story at some point.

The reverse of the above photograph.

Lucille Edwards of Capa, SD

Reese and Rinehart

Horace Greeley Reese, Sr. In College

Above we see Horace Greeley Reese, Sr. (1876-1954). I would bet a dollar that Horace was named after Horace Greeley (1811-1872) who was the founder and editor of the New-York Tribune, a member of the U. S. House of Representatives, and a presidential candidate of the Liberal Republican Party who lost to Ulysses S. Grant in a landslide in 1872. The caption on the back of the photograph says it was taken while he was in college. Horace attended Western Maryland College (now McDaniel College) where he won the freshman class gold medal in 1896 and graduated in the class of 1899.

Horace was the son of David Reese (1825-1895) and Sarah C. Burns (1844-1899). He grew up on farm on what is now Meadow Branch Road southwest of Westminster, MD. The Reese farm was surrounded by the farms of family members, part of a large parcel of land passed down through the family of his paternal grandmother Rebecca Roop (1803-1872) who married Andrew Reese (1791-1826) in 1822.

(MHT CARR-19)

Horace began working at the Westminster Post Office while still in college. By 1902 he had risen to the position of chief clerk under postmaster Milton Schaeffer (1853-1902), a former Republican mayor of Westminster and a prominent Carroll County businessman who had been appointed in 1898. Under Schaeffer’s supervision, in 1899 Carroll County became the first county in the U. S. to completely implement Rural Free Delivery and Horace participated in the first run in April.

Schaeffer died in September 1902 and Horace was appointed acting postmaster to serve out the remainder of Schaeffer’s term, but he was eventually passed over for the permanent job. Horace married Schaeffer’s oldest daughter, Edna Eugenia Schaeffer (1879-1954), on 31 December 1902. Edna’s mother was Mary Susan Zacharias (1857-1943). Horace resigned from the Westminster post office in September 1904 and took a job in Memphis working for the U. S. Post Office’s Rural Free Delivery Southern Division. He went on to become a mail inspector and to work all over the South. Horace was credited with capturing a number of crooks and fraudsters who used the postal service to carry out their crimes.

Horace and Edna had four children, Horace Greeley Reese, Jr. (1906-1979), Kathleen Diehl Reese (1915-1991), Mary Elizabeth Reese (1918-2006), and Milton Schaeffer Reese (1920-1992). The couple retired in Florida at the end of Horace’s 45-year career, died within months of each other, and were buried in Memorial Park Cemetery in St. Petersburg, FL.

Mary Reese Rinehart

Above we see Mary Ann Reese (1832-1922). She was a daughter of Andrew Reese (1800-1884) and Hannah Leister (1802-1888), the last survivor of their nine children. I think she was related to Horrace primarily because they shared the same great-grandfather, Andrew Reese (1709-1794). She married Jeremiah Rinehart (1821-1897) in August 1882 after his first wife, Mary A. Maus (1822-1882), died in May of that year.

Both of these photographs were produced by Sereck Shallcross Wilson (1870-1943). Serick was born in Middletown, DE. He moved to Westminster in 1901 and operated a studio there from 1902-1910 and 1920-1932. Between 1910 and 1920 he worked in Washington and Baltimore. These dates cause me to question the “in college” note on the back of Horace’s photograph but it is a discrepancy which could be easily explained. Sereck’s wife was Mary Gertrude Weaver (1880-1971) who happened to be a granddaughter of Jeremiah Rinehart.

These photographs were bought at an antique store on The Avenue in Hampden neighborhood of Baltimore.

Reese and Rinehart

Daughters of Joshua Hood

I bought this batch of 12 photographs at an antique store on The Avenue in Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood. The photographs appear to be duplicates of older photographs. Each one is contained in a cardboard folder measuring 3.25 x 4 inches with the logo “Pack Bros., 112 West Lexington St., Baltimore, MD” on the front. As best I can determine, the Pack Brothers, led by Walter Burton Pack (1870-1960), operated at that address, also known as the London Studio, from about 1904 to about 1908. Inside each of the folders is a handwritten note containing what biographical information was known to the writer. Each photograph’s caption quotes the note that came with it.

The following gentleman is Joshua Hood (1804-1890) who descended from a namesake who settled in the Howard County, MD area in the 1600s. He was born near Warfieldsburg, MD, the son of Benjamin Hood (1778-1848), a well-known Methodist Episcopal preacher, and Sally Wayman (1778-1864). Joshua is said to have introduced the Marquis de Lafayette to the people of Cooksville, MD and “played a prominent role at the grand ball at Annapolis given in honor of the Marquis” in December 1824 during the Frenchman’s 16-month-long tour of the USA. Joshua married Matilda Ann Haughey (1807-1866) of Delaware in April 1825. They had nine children that I found.

Emily Jane Hood father, __________ Hood

Next we have three photographs of Clara Hood Walker (1857-1918). Clara was the daughter of Samuel Theophilus Walker (1828-1901) and Emily Jane Hood (1830-1867). Emily was a daughter of Joshua Hood.

Clara Hood Walker, about 2 yr old, Mrs. Andrew Jackson Young
Clara Hood Walker, Born Nov. 4, 1857, about 9 yr old with cousin Edward Van Sant

The boy standing with Clara in the above photograph is Edward Van Sant (1858-1931), the son of Nicholson Van Sant (1817-1902) and Sally M. Hood (1826-1897), Sally being another of Joshua Hood’s daughters.

Clara Hood Walker, 28 yr old, Married Andrew Jackson Young, 48 yr. old, Nov. 4, 1885

Clara married Andrew Jackson Young (1837-1920) who was born in Baltimore, one of the eight children of William Scott Young (1801-1888) and Mary A. Dutton (1800-1887). William bought a farm in Abingdon, MD in 1837 and that is where Andrew grew up. According to William’s obituary, as a boy during the War of 1812 he “helped to throw up the embankments which are still reserved around Patterson Park, Baltimore.” William served as “a member of the revenue force under President Andrew Jackson” and held elective office in Harford County, MD as a member of the Native American Party. Andrew was affiliated with the Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington Railroad until he turned to real estate in the mid-1890s. At his death he had been the proprietor of the real estate firm A. J. Young & Company for about 25 years.

Andrew Jackson Young, about 18
Andrew Jackson Young, about 22 or 23
Andrew Jackson Young, b. 1837, son of Wm Scott Young & Mary Dutton, Wm S. Y. born Jan 1801, Mary Dutton b. Dec 1799

Clara and Andrew had three children: Eldridge Hood Young (1886-1957) who married Nadine P. Showell (1888-1959); Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. (1888-1965) who married Elizabeth Welsh van Sweringen Rhodes (1891-1970); and Emily Dutton Young (1891-1981) who married Harold Frederic Spiers (1894-1962). It was a big help to me that Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Maryland because the pedigrees of the society’s members are available on Ancestry.com.

The next photograph and its caption are mysterious. According to the note accompanying it, the subject is Matilda Hood, a wife of Benjamin F. Walker (1830-1899) who was a brother of the aforementioned Samuel Theophilus Walker, but Benjamin’s wives were actually Amelia D. Hood (~1836-~1864), another daughter of Joshua Hood, and Mary T. Harmer (1852-1893). The confusion may arise from Amelia having been a daughter of a Matilda and the mother of Matilda A. “Tillie” Walker (1855-1925). “Amelia W. Walker” is inscribed on Benjamin’s tombstone but without dates.

Matilda Hood, m. Frank Walker, Bro Samuel T. Walker, died when she was 28.

The note writer thought the lady in the next photograph is Ella Hood who married Samuel Burgess, but it was Ella M. Walker (1854-1943) who married Samuel French Burgess (1839-1906). Ella Hood (1851-1923), another daughter of Joshua Hood, married Joshua Warfield Baxley (1848-1910).

I think, Ella Hood, m. Samuel Burgess

Next up is William S. Young (1828-1892), the first son of William Scott Young and brother of Andrew Jackson Young. William was also born in Baltimore and raised in Harford County. He was elected Harford County, MD surveyor as a Democrat in 1853 and served in that capacity until he was elected county sheriff in 1867. He was admitted to the Harford County Bar in 1870 and “soon acquired a considerable reputation as a brilliant speaker and a quick, ready lawyer.” He married Mary Elizabeth Cochran (1828-1915). They had nine children who survived to adulthood.

William Young of Bel Air, eldist child of William Scott Young and Mary Dutton

Finally, the following photograph had no note. Could this be William Scott Young?

(This one had no note.)

Below is what the notebook containing each photograph looks like.

I originally wrote the blog with a focus on Andrew Jackson Young and Clara Hood Walker because they were the subjects of the majority of the photographs.. I re-wrote the post when I realized the actual theme should be the daughters of Joshua Hood.

Daughters of Joshua Hood

An Unusual Personal Attraction

Juliana Brent Keyser

According to the inscription on its back, the subject of the above photograph is Juliana Brent Keyser (1891-1975). I think the style of her hat dates the photograph to around 1910. When Baltimore newspapers still had “social pages” they followed every move of the debutante and her family.

Her father was Robert Brent Keyser (1859-1927) who was a president of Johns Hopkins University‘s Board of Trustees and oldest son of Baltimore industrialist William Keyser (1835-1904) who, along with his cousin William Wyman (1825-1903) and others, helped establish the university’s Homewood Campus in the early 20th Century. Her mother was Ellen Carr McHenry (1860-1946) who was a great-granddaughter of both John Eager Howard (1752-1827) and James McHenry (1753-1816) for whom Fort McHenry was named. Juliana was possibly named after her great-grandmother Juliana Elizabeth Howard McHenry (1796-1821) and her grandmother Mary Hoke Brent Keyser (1838-1911). Her only sister was Ellen McHenry Keyser (1892-1980) who married James Cabell Bruce (1892-1980). Her only brother was William McHenry Keyser (1897-1928) who married Marjorie Hambleton Ober (1900-1977) before his early death as the result of an automobile accident.

The Keyser family’s town home was located at 1201 North Calvert Street in Baltimore. The announcement of its sale after her father’s death in 1927 said the house “occupies a lot of 38 by 133 feet” and “contains four stories and thirty-two rooms, with eight baths, and an electric elevator.” The property is currently listed as nearly 12,000 square feet. The family’s country home, nearly always said to be “in the Green Spring Valley,” was Dunlora, later called Merry Hill, located in what is now the Anton Woods development in Baltimore County. According to Census records, in 1900 the family had nine servants; in 1910 the family had five servants; in 1920 the family had two maids and a butler.

Her parents “introduced” Juliana at a reception held at their town home in December 1910. The Baltimore Sun article about the reception described her as “one of the most important debutantes of several years, combining as she does birth, wealth, position, an unusual personal attraction.” December, January, and February of 1910 were filled with receptions, dances, a bal poudr├ę, and in each announcement the setting and her clothing were precisely detailed. Several articles described her “surgical operation for appendicitis” at Johns Hopkins Hospital in November 1911. The family’s travels, domestic and foreign, and the annual moves between houses, were meticulously reported.

Juliana and Gaylord Lee Clark (1883-1969), a Baltimore assistant state’s attorney, announced their engagement at a “german” in February 1921 and The Baltimore Sun described the occasion this way: Juliana Keyser and Gaylord Clark simply “made” the dance by announcing their engagement. Everyone, of course, had noticed Gaylord’s attentions, but both he and Juliana have had so many admirers that nobody felt called upon to make any remarks in this case. That sentence is not as crazy as it sounds, for Gaylord had caused many a feminine heart to flutter, both here and elsewhere, and Juliana is not the sort of girl to care for a man whom no one else could see on the earth.

Gaylord and Juliana were married in April, 1921. He was born in Mobile, AL to Gaylord Blair Clark, Sr. (1846-1893), a lawyer who had been a member of the Virginia Military Institute Corps of Cadets who fought at the Battle of New Market on 15 May 1864, and Lettice Lee Smith (1855-1914). Gaylord had a distinguished military career like his father, serving in Maryland’s 5th Regiment during the Mexican Border War and as a company commander in the 29th Division during World War I when he was cited for gallantry under fire two times during October 1918. During World War II he was executive officer of the Maryland State Guard with the rank of colonel. After the war he joined the law firm of Semmes, Bowen, and Semmes and became a partner in 1935. He served as president of the Family Welfare Association was named state parole commissioner in 1932.

There is a lot more to know about Juliana than there is about the usual subjects of this blog, so I’ll end with a jumble of interesting tidbits. She was educated at Calvert School, Bryn Mawr School, and Miss Porter’s School. She served as a volunteer and leader of Planned Parenthood in the 1930s and remained interested in the organization all her life. When the Junior League of Baltimore was established in 1912 Juliana served as its first president until 1916. She helped organize the 1920 Lecture Club and hosted its first meeting in November 1919 where the English novelist Hugh Walpole was the speaker. In April, 1914 she hosted “about four hundred modishly dressed young women of the ‘leisure class'” who heard the evangelist Billy Sunday urge them to “leave behind something more than an obituary notice in a newspaper and a piece of black crepe floating on the door.” English miniature portraitist Charles James Turrell (1846-1932) produced “an especially fine likeness” of her in 1922. It was Juliana’s “unflagging efforts” which led to the establishment on the Homewood Campus of memorials to her grandfather William Keyser and great uncles Samuel and William Wyman, efforts which resulted in the naming of the Keyser Quadrangle and the Wyman Quadrangle.

To learn more and see a description of the Keyser-Wyman papers, look here.

Reverse of the Photograph
An Unusual Personal Attraction

Wilbur and His Mother

Wilbur Parmely and his Mother (G’pa Parmely & Great Grandma Parmely)

The subjects of the above photograph are as James Wilbur Parmely (1863-1922) and his mother Elizabeth Toay Ferrill (1844-1908). As you can see below, the reverse of the photograph also shows the name of Wilbur’s son Edwin Samuel Parmely (1890-1957). I resolved this possible confusion by dating Elizabeth’s dress to the 1860s. This photograph was purchased from Artifacts, Antiques, and Art on Main Street in Spearfish, SD by a StuffCTWFound.com field operative.

Elizabeth was born in Montreal, one of five children of James Ferrill (1799-1864) and Mary Toay (1810-1888) of Cornwall, England. The couple married in 1834, moved to Canada in the 1840s, and had settled in Wisconsin by 1849. There she married Melvin Augustus Parmely (1843-1910) in 1862 and Wilbur was the first of their 12 children.

Melvin was born in Missouri, the first of more than 20 children fathered by Ellsworth M. Parmely (1819-1913) and his four wives. Rhoda Emmaline Knowlton (1819-1855) was his mother. Melvin’s roots were also in southern England: John Parmely (1615-1689), Melvin’s fourth great-grandfather, emigrated from East Sussex, England to the Connecticut Colony in 1639. Soon after Melvin was born the family moved to Wisconsin, then to Iowa, then to South Dakota in about 1882. He received four land patents in Hand County, SD between 1888 and 1901.

Wilbur was born in Wisconsin. He was a farmer all his life. He married Isabella Hastings Barrett (1870-1910) in Hand County in 1890. Isabella had emigrated from Scotland with her parents, Thomas Barrett (1851-1905) and Mary Stevenson (1850-1918), in 1871 and spent time in Pennsylvania and Iowa before settling in South Dakota. Wilbur and Isabella had five children.

The Parmely family is very well documented on genealogy websites and there is a comprehensive family website where I reckon this photograph may one day appear. There is also a cache of letters from the early 1800s in the Sylvanus and Lois Gould Parmely Collection at the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan. Sylvanus (1784-1874) and Lois (1789-1873) were Melvin’s paternal grandparents and early settlers in Ashland and Lorain Counties in Ohio.

Wilbur and His Mother

Sallie and Friends

Sallie Branch Vann Yokley

The inscription on the back of the above photograph (see below) says “Me, Sallie Vann Yokley.” We’ve seen over they years that people sometimes do not have precise memories of faces in photographs and the identities of their owners, but we usually take it for granted that the inscriber recognizes herself. In this batch there is some doubt about who everybody else might be.

Sallie Branch Vann (1890-1980) was born in Enfield, NC to Macon Edward Vann (1862-1932), a ship pipefitter, mail carrier, and bookkeeper, and Sallie Branch (1866-1890) who were married in Halifax County, NC in 1887. Her mother died 31 days after she was born. Her only sibling was her older brother, John Richard Vann (1888-1971).

Sallie married William Ross Yokley (1884-1970), a Baptist minister known as Ross, in 1914 at in Pineville, KY. The ceremony was performed by William Cartwright Sale (1876-1958), who may have been an Army buddy of Ross’s, and Sale’s wife, Grace Porter (1875-1953), played “Hearts and Flowers.” Sallie and Ross probably met while both were students at the “Missionary Training School” in Louisville. Ross was born Hughsville, MO to Amos N. Yokley (1859-1949) of NC and Mollie Ann Smith (1857-1920) of KY. After studying at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, Ross was ordained at his home church, Bethel Baptist Church near La Monte, MO in 1907. Ross served at churches from Ohio to Florida, and as a chaplain in the U. S. Army and the Civilian Conservation Corps. They had five children: Mary Virginia Yokley (1915-2004); Sarah Virginia Yokley (1916-2009); Josephine Hunter Yokley (1918-1997); William Ross Yokley, Jr (1921-1952); and Carolyn Dehaven Yokley (1927-1999). Sallie, Ross, Sr., and Ross Jr. are buried in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery in Louisville.

Sallie wrote on the back of the following photograph that its subject is Lutie Mary Love (1892-1977). She did not name the dogs.

Lutie Morrison Love

Lutie Mary Morrison (1892-1977) was born in Lynchburg, VA to James Nelson Morrison (1848-1926) and Lutie Ann Bunch (1848-1940). She married Jacob Taylor Love (1889-1945) and they had four children.

The inscription on the back of the following photograph identifies the ladies as Edith Boswell and Sallie Vann Yokley. I could not find Edith Boswell and suspect the lady on the right is actually Lutie Morrison Love.

Identified as Edith Boswell and Sallie Van Yokley

The last photograph is inscribed, “Harlan, KY, 1914.”

“Harlan, KY 1914”

Following are the backs of the photographs in order of their appearance.

Sallie and Friends

Edward Porter Alexander III

This is a portraito
Edward Porter Alexander, III

Above is a portrait of Edward Porter Alexander, III (1891-1918). He was born in Duluth, MN to Edward Porter Alexander, Jr. (1863-1939) and Agnes Gordon Grady (1872-1963).

Both of his grandfathers were Confederate Army officers. His paternal grandfather, Brigadier General Edward Porter Alexander (1935-1910) of Georgia, “made history by being the first to use signal flags to transmit a message during combat over long a long distance” and wrote two highly regarded books about the the American Civil War. His maternal grandfather, Cuthbert Powell Grady (1840-1922) of Virginia, enlisted as a private in 1861 and finished the war as a captain and brigade assistant adjutant general.

Porter, as he was known, attended the University of Minnesota [UM] in the class of 1913, but he apparently dropped out after 1911. The stamp on the photograph card above appears to be UM’s mascot, a gopher, over a seal with a bow, but I could not prove it. If it is a gopher and a seal associated with UM, that would date the photograph to 1909-1911. Porter appeared in the 1911 UM yearbook, The Gopher, as the assistant secretary of the staff of the Men’s Union Carnival which occurred 22 October that year and started out “with a three mile parade, brought up in the rear by the Dekes on the water wagon.” He was also a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. Porter graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1914 with a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering. He was elected as a Junior of the American Society of Civil Engineers in November 1914. Porter returned to Duluth after graduating and started a contracting company called Alexander & Farrell with James A. Farrell (1876-1937), a former assistant city engineer of Duluth.

Porter married Myra Sundquist Salyards (1896-1972) in August 1917. Myra was born in North Dakota to Henry Franklin Salyards (1871-1944) and Mary Lane Ely (1871-1941), natives of Missouri. Henry was president of Ely, Salyards and Company, in Duluth, a firm involved in the distribution of grain all across the upper Northwest.

During the Tampico Affair in 1914, an episode of American involvement in the Mexican Revolution, while still a student at MIT, Porter applied for a commission in the U.S. Army. When the U.S. entered World War I in 1917 Porter received his commission as a first lieutenant in the Engineers Reserve Corps. He trained at Fort Snelling, MN, then trained at the Engineers Training Camp at Fort Leavenworth, KS, then had overseas training at Fort Travis, TX. On 17 February 1918 Porter departed Hoboken, NJ aboard the USS President Grant as a member of the 509th Engineers, Service Battalion-Colored which consisted of “17 officers (white), 101 non-commissioned officers (white) and 798 privates (colored).” They arrived at Brest, France, on 4 March 1918. He was an adjutant of Company D of the 509th at Saint-Nazaire, France, when he died of influenza on 5 September 1918 at the age of 27. He was buried in an American cemetery at Saint-Nazaire then re-interred at Arlington National Cemetery on 26 January 1922.

Tombstone of Edward Porter Alexander III, Arlington National Cemetery, Plot 3-4412-WS; FindaGrave Memorial ID 32488044

Myra married Louis Carl Hofmeister (1893-1990), a Tuscon banker, in October 1920, and they had two children.

Reverse of the above portrait of Edward Porter Alexander, III

I purchased this photograph at Station North Books (IG @stationnorthbooks, FB StationNorthBooks) on East Lanvale Street in the Station North neighborhood of Baltimore when the owner invited me down for a look-see. He had seen the article about this blog in Baltimore Magazine and thought I might like the place–he was right. You will love the place if you like old stuff.

Edward Porter Alexander III

Mr. and Mrs. Wantz and Their Church, 1919

Ada Naomi Myers (l) and Edward Morrison Wantz (r)

The couple pictured above are Naomi Ada Myers (1891-1971) and her husband Edward Morrison Wantz (1886-1972) who resided in Pleasant Valley, a village in the vicinity of Westminster in Carroll County, MD.

Naomi was the oldest child of the five children of Upton Harvey “Uppie” Myers (1865-1936), a huckster, and Alice Catherine Motter (1863-1940) who married in 1890. Edward was the oldest of the 11 children of George Zephenia Wentz (1863-1921), a farmer in Uniontown, MD, and Mary Ann Helwig (1866-1949). Generally speaking, the name Wantz was rendered Wentz until Edward’s generation, but many times both spellings were used for the same family.

Naomi and Edward were married in the Lutheran Parsonage at Silver Run, MD, on 24 January 1911. They had two children. First came Margaret C. Wantz (1912-2001) who married James Norman Brown (1910-1990) in 1933 and had three children. Next came Richard Edward Wantz (1914-2002) who married Portia Virginia Crabbs (1919-2004) and had one child.

Wantz-Myers Wedding Announcement (The Democratic Advocate, Westminster, MD, 27 January 1911, p. 8)

Edward was a farmer, carpenter, furniture maker, and businessman buying and selling farm land and equipment. He served on the boards of the Union Mills Bank and the Westminster Trust Company which were among the predecessors of PNC Financial Services. Edward was also a founding member of the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Company. Edward was a charter member of the Pleasant Valley Cemetery Association, the cemetery where he and Naomi are buried, as are Margaret and Richard and their spouses.

Naomi and Edward were members of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church in Pleasant Valley and following is the church’s annual report for 1919. (You can download a .pdf of the report here.) Edward was presented with the first life membership in the church’s history in 1961. According to the history of St. Mary’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in Silver Run, which traces its origin to the unification of Lutheran and Reformed churches in 1762, St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church in Pleasant Valley was founded and 1879 and joined St. Mary’s in a two-church parish, a relationship which lasted until 1990. In 1991, St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church and St. Matthew’s United Church congregations, which were using the same building in Pleasant Valley, united to become St. Matthew’s United Church of Christ at Pleasant Valley. It gets a little confusing, but some understanding can be gained from this this Wikipedia entry about the United Church of Christ.

Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, cover
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 2
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 3
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 4
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 5
Annual Report of St. Matthew’s United Lutheran Church at Pleasant Valley, Md for the year 1919, page 6

Pleasant Valley, MD and surroundings in 1877 (Atlas of Carroll County, Lake Griffing & Stevenson, 1877)
Reverse of the Portrait at Top of Page

Mr. and Mrs. Wantz and Their Church, 1919

Three Baltimore Ladies

Mary Ann Jessup Clemens Aul

The above photograph depicts Mary Ann Jessup Clemens (1846-1930). Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Augustus Ducas Clemens (1817-1897) and Henrietta Matilda Bryden (1812-1900) who married in 1841. She served as Grand Deputy for Maryland of Ladies of the Golden Eagle, the female auxiliary of the Knights of the Golden Eagle of which her husband served as Supreme Chief. During 1889-1922 she conducted dozens of real estate transactions that were recorded in local newspapers.

Henrietta was the daughter of William Bryden (1767-1840), a ship captain who was born in Edinburgh, and Elizabeth Goodman (1769-1839) who was born in London. William’s brother, James Bryden (1761-1820), was a proprietor of the Fountain Inn which stood on Light Street between West Baltimore and Redwood Streets until 1871. Henrietta was born and grew up on the family place which was located south of East Biddle Street between North Kenwood Avenue and Edison Highway. The site was later St. Alphonsus’ Cemetery until that was abandoned and industry took over.

Augustus was known as Augustus, Sr. because the was the first of his line born in the U.S., but he is sometimes identified as the fourth. His father, also Augustus Ducas Clemens, was thought to be a captain in the French fleet during the American Revolution. According to an obituary (pdf) printed in The Baltimore Sun of 25 September 1897, Augustus “laid off” the villages of Friendship and Oxford in 1868 “on what was then known as the Quaker lots.” Oxford and Friendship are now part of of the Better Waverly neighborhood on the east side of Greenmount Avenue between 25th and 29th Streets, and what is now known as Lock Raven Road was then known as Quaker Road. There is a Friendship Street in the vicinity but no easy-to-find sign of Oxford. In 1845 Augustus was appointed “agent to the city of Baltimore . . . to collect DONATIONS to erect a NATIONAL EQUESTRIAN STATUE, of imperishable Bronze, at the U. S. Seat of Government, to the memory of Hero and Patriot, ANDREW JACKSON.” The statue of President Andrew Jackson was installed in Lafayette Park across from the White House in 1853.

Mary married Jacob Henry Aull (1847-1921) in 1883 and they had one child, Herbert Walter Aull (1872-1961). Their house, Eagle Nest, was on a large lot on the northwest corner of the intersection of 25th Street and Greenmount Avenue. Jacob was also a real estate man and he sold insurance. He was a member of Fellowship Lodge 138, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and at the time of his death was the oldest past president of the Knights of the Golden Eagle. Jacob was the son of German-born parents, shoemaker Jacob Aull (1804-1876) and his wife Christiana Gusema (1812-1880). Jacob published a fine little book titled Old Land Marks which I enjoyed seeing in the Maryland Department of the Enoch Pratt Free Library (call number F190.7 .W3 A8). The book contains 37 photographs and descriptions which are listed here (pdf). It would be great if someone decided to reprint the book.

Eagle Nest, the Residence of Jacob Henry Aull and Mary Ann Jessup Clemens which became Adelaide Hall, a Boarding Home for Girls, and the Southern Hospital (The Baltimore Sun of 30 May 1912)
Helen Mary Bordley, AKA “Augie”

Pictured above is Helen Mary “Augie” Bordley (1871-1953). I found no explanation for the nickname Augie. She was the daughter of William Clayton Bordley, Jr. (1831-1897) and Laura Fitzgerald (1843-1886). William was a teller at the National Mechanics’ Bank until he resigned because of ill health and was appointed to the Baltimore tax department. Laura was a niece of Richard B. Fitzgerald (1807-1869) who was a sea captain and owner, with his half brother Washington Booth (1814-1892), of the Fitzgerald, Booth & Company, an international mercantile and shipping house based in Baltimore.

Census records all list Helen’s occupation as “none” or leave the section blank, but newspapers accounts show she conducted more than a dozen real estate transactions between 1921 and 1941. From at least 1900 until her death Helen lived with the family of her father’s sister, Mary Bordley (1852-1928), who married Augustus Ducas Clemens, Jr. (1845-1909), brother of Mary Ann Jessup Clemens Aull who is the subject of the photograph at the top of this page. Most of that time was at, or in the vicinity of Evesham (pronunciation), a 23-room stone mansion on a 56-acre estate located on what is now Dartmouth Road in the Evesham Park neighborhood. Augustus, Jr. bought the estate 1895 for $40,000. Augustus, Jr. intended to develop the land from the beginning but the mansion survived until 1961. The mansion’s carriage house was converted to a residence and remains there on a small lot on Dartmouth Glen Way. Look here (pdf) for a story about the Clemens family and Evesham, and here (pdf) to learn how Augustus, Sr.’s grandson, Bryden Bordley Hyde (1914-2001) used parts of the mansion to construct a home on Gibson Island, MD

Lydia McGee

Above is Lydia McGee (1848-1928) who also was a boarder with Mary A. J. Clemens Aull and family from around 1898 until her death. A death notice (pdf) identified her father as Robert L. McGee, but I think this Robert was actually her brother. Her parents appear to have been James McGee, born in Scotland in 1812, and Ellen Wright, born in England in 1819. James’ profession is “Bleacher” in the 1850 Census of Baltimore County, MD, and his sons followed him into this industry. This, along with other tidbits of information, indicates that Ellen was the sister of three brothers who established the Rockland Bleach and Dye Mill in Rockland, MD in the 1830s. The enterprise remained in the family until the 1940s and survives today as Rockland Bleach and Dye Works, a division of Rockland Industries, now known as Roc-Ion.

Lydia was a teacher all her life. A January 1874 newspaper account places her at Waverly High School on York Road. The school opened the year with 125 students and had 230 students by mid year. By 1881 Lydia was at the English-German Annex School #12 which educated 333 pupils that year. In 1914 she was honored (pdf) by former pupils as one of six surviving teachers at “the old Baltimore County School No. 13, which was started as a parochial school of St. John’s German Lutheran Church, Catherine and Lombard Streets, in 1872.” Her uncle Thomas Wright (1811-1900) bequeathed her two bonds of the City and Suburban Railway Company of $1000 each ($2000 = about $60,000 in 2019 dollars). Lydia also bought and sold real estate.

The following are the backs of the above photographs.

Back of Photograph of Mary Ann Jessup Clemen
Back of Photograph of Helen Mary Bordley
Back of Photograph of Lydia McGee

I spent more time reading and learning, finding graves and documenting them, and driving around looking at stuff than I did writing this time. Usually I’m looking for a little interesting information on a subject, but this time the amount of information on these families was overwhelming. I collected more than 150 newspaper articles. If you are curious about something you read here, drop me a line–I probably know the answer to your question or can find it.

I am most indebted to Suzanne LNU, the author of the excellent website Descent By Sea which discusses the genealogies of the Clemens and Bordley families, among others.

I am also grateful for the help I received from Mimi at the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore who helped me track down the location of Helen Mary Bordley’s grave, a critical bit of information that helped figure out who Helen was and where she came from.

Three Baltimore Ladies

The Benz Family

Helen, Hazel, and Alma Benz, circa 190

Pictured above are the Benz sisters. The baby in the chair is Helen M. Benz (1902-1970). Standing behind her is the next oldest sister, Hazel Benz (1897-1970). Big sister Alma Barbara Benz (1891-1909) is sitting. They were born and raised in Newark, NJ.

Their parents were George Benz (1866-1927) and Flora C. Hillert (1872-1953). All four of their grandparents were born in Germany and died in New Jersey.

Below is Alma as a younger girl. According to an obituary on her findagrave.com memorial, Alma died suddenly at home at 326 New York Avenue in Newark after being “in failing health for a long time . . . a faithful member of St. Stephen’s German Evangelical Church, its Society of Sunday School Teachers and Christian Endeavor Society, and the church choir . . . employed in the novelty department of the Celluloid Company.”

Alma Barbara Benz

Here is a photograph of Alma later in life:

Alma Benz, courtesy of Frank and Silvia McDonald

Hazel worked as a clerk and a seamstress and never married. Here she is in adulthood:

Hazel F. Benz, courtesy of Frank and Silvia McDonald

Below is a photograph of Helen as an adult. Helen married Roy Morgan (1891-1986), a mechanic born in Texas, and they had one daughter, Gladys Morgan (1936-1952), who died after a long illness at the age of 15. From the “In Memoriam” page of the Bloomfield (NJ) High School yearbook of 1954: “A vivid picture of Gladys’ small, quiet countenance can be recalled, curled up with a good novel or hiking on a brisk afternoon.”

Helen M. Benz Morgan, courtesy of Frank and Silvia McDonald

Below is a photograph of the girls’ mother, Flora. Identifications written on the photographs in this batch and the available records cause some confusion about Flora’s maiden name. In official records of her marriage to George and Hazel’s birth her maiden name is listed as Leitlein. All other available records, including some findagrave.com memorials created in modern times by relatives, show her to be the daughter of Ernest G. Hillert (1855-1937) and Anna Shubert (??-1907).

Flora C. Hillert Benz

Ernest and Anna had one other daughter, Frieda B. Hillert (1886-1947) who married Ferdinand H. Ehret (1884-1951). This batch includes three photographs of her:

Frieda B. Hillert Ehret
Frieda B. Hillert Ehret
Frieda B. Hillert Ehret

My head started spinning when I came across the following two photographs of Anna C. Leitlein (1870-??) who married a machinist named Maxmillian Joseph Eberle (1870-??) in 1891. They lived many years at 349 Walnut Street in Newark. Her parents were apparently G. Leitlein who was born in W├╝rttemberg, Germany around 1843, and his wife Anna. I could find very little information on the Eberle and Leitlein families.

Anna C. Leinlein Eberle and Mrs. Kunz
Anna C. Leinlein Eberle

I’ve spent enough time on this post. Newspapers.com hasn’t made any Newark papers available and without obituaries it is just too difficult to get to the real truth from the comfort of my home office command center. I’ll just post a few more of the photographs contained in this batch and leave it to the Internet to fill in the blanks as time goes by.

Here are Albert Benz and Jessie Benz. I suspect these are Albert Russell Benz (1866-??) and his mother Jessie G. Howe (1866-??) who married Martin Benz (1855-??). I could not connect them to our known Benz family members.

Albert Benz
Albert Benz
Jessie Benz

Here is Christina Volz. Three people named Christina Volz died in Essex County, NJ during 1894-1895 and I was unable to determine which one of them this is.

Each of the following three photographs has a caption on the back rather than the front, and the handwriting is different from the handwriting on the other photographs. These might not be associated with the others for any reason other than I found them in the same box.

Samuel Yobe, brother of Uncle Will, is a mystery to me:

Samuel Yobe

Below we have Rebecca Miller and her husband James Connell.

Frank and Silvia McDonald are genealogists and memorialists who allowed me to use the photographs they put on the findagrave.com memorials for the Benz sisters. Thank you! I provided the memorial number for Alma above. Hazel Benz’s memorial is #84386396, Helen’s is #74553594 and Gladys’s is #74554704. From there you can link to their parents and other relations.

The Benz Family